Switzerland

Critically Insufficient4°C+
World
Commitments with this rating fall well outside the fair share range and are not at all consistent with holding warming to below 2°C let alone with the Paris Agreement’s stronger 1.5°C limit. If all government targets were in this range, warming would exceed 4°C.
Highly insufficient< 4°C
World
Commitments with this rating fall outside the fair share range and are not at all consistent with holding warming to below 2°C let alone with the Paris Agreement’s stronger 1.5°C limit. If all government targets were in this range, warming would reach between 3°C and 4°C.
Insufficient< 3°C
World
Commitments with this rating are in the least stringent part of their fair share range and not consistent with holding warming below 2°C let alone with the Paris Agreement’s stronger 1.5°C limit. If all government targets were in this range, warming would reach over 2°C and up to 3°C.
2°C Compatible< 2°C
World
Commitments with this rating are consistent with the 2009 Copenhagen 2°C goal and therefore fall within the country’s fair share range, but are not fully consistent with the Paris Agreement. If all government targets were in this range, warming could be held below, but not well below, 2°C and still be too high to be consistent with the Paris Agreement 1.5°C limit.
1.5°C Paris Agreement Compatible< 1.5°C
World
This rating indicates that a government’s efforts are in the most stringent part of its fair share range: it is consistent with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit.
Role model<< 1.5°C
World
This rating indicates that a government’s efforts are more ambitious than what is considered a fair contribution: it is more than consistent with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit.

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Overview

Swiss climate policy needs more action: with its currently implemented policies it falls short of even meeting its domestic 2030 target of a 30% reduction below 1990 levels suggested by the government (‘Bundresrat’ or Federal Council), let alone the overall 50% reduction below 1990 levels by 2030 set out in its NDC.

Planned policies to be debated in the Swiss Parliament this year aim at a continuation and strengthening of existing policies and would achieve a 2030 target of a 35% reduction below 1990 levels.

The transportation sector will especially need increased policy attention to meet the commitment made in the Paris Agreement. While considered a frontrunner for its investment and recognition of the opportunities from modal shift to trains, Switzerland is lacking a comprehensive road transport decarbonisation vision. Switzerland could usefully follow other countries in phasing-out of fossil fuel cars in new car sales within the next 10–20 years and implement policy steps to step up the transition towards a decarbonised economy.

Overall, we rate both Switzerland’s currently implemented climate policies as well its NDC, which stipulates a 50% reduction in emissions below 1990 levels by 2030, “Insufficient,” meaning that Switzerland’s climate plans are not consistent with holding warming to below 2°C, let alone limiting it to 1.5°C as required under the Paris Agreement, and are instead consistent with warming between 2°C and 3°C.

Switzerland communicated an indicative emissions reduction target of 35% for 2025 below 1990 levels. Previously, Switzerland had made an unconditional commitment under the Copenhagen Accord to decrease emissions by 20% below 1990 levels by 2020.

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