Nepal

Critically Insufficient4°C+
World
NDCs with this rating fall well outside of a country’s “fair share” range and are not at all consistent with holding warming to below 2°C let alone with the Paris Agreement’s stronger 1.5°C limit. If all government NDCs were in this range, warming would exceed 4°C. For sectors, the rating indicates that the target is consistent with warming of greater than 4°C if all other sectors were to follow the same approach.
Highly insufficient< 4°C
World
NDCs with this rating fall outside of a country’s “fair share” range and are not at all consistent with holding warming to below 2°C let alone with the Paris Agreement’s stronger 1.5°C limit. If all government NDCs were in this range, warming would reach between 3°C and 4°C. For sectors, the rating indicates that the target is consistent with warming between 3°C and 4°C if all other sectors were to follow the same approach.
Insufficient< 3°C
World
NDCs with this rating are in the least stringent part of a country’s “fair share” range and not consistent with holding warming below 2°C let alone with the Paris Agreement’s stronger 1.5°C limit. If all government NDCs were in this range, warming would reach over 2°C and up to 3°C. For sectors, the rating indicates that the target is consistent with warming over 2°C and up to 3°C if all other sectors were to follow the same approach.
2°C Compatible< 2°C
World
NDCs with this rating are consistent with the 2009 Copenhagen 2°C goal and therefore fall within a country’s “fair share” range, but are not fully consistent with the Paris Agreement long term temperature goal. If all government NDCs were in this range, warming could be held below, but not well below, 2°C and still be too high to be consistent with the Paris Agreement 1.5°C limit. For sectors, the rating indicates that the target is consistent with holding warming below, but not well below, 2°C if all other sectors were to follow the same approach.
1.5°C Paris Agreement Compatible< 1.5°C
World
This rating indicates that a government’s NDCs in the most stringent part of its “fair share” range: it is consistent with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit. For sectors, the rating indicates that the target is consistent with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit.
Role model<< 1.5°C
World
This rating indicates that a government’s NDC is more ambitious than what is considered a “fair” contribution: it is more than consistent with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit. No “role model” rating has been developed for the sectors.

List of references

  • CIAT; World Bank; CCAFS and LI-BIRD. (2017). Climate-Smart Agriculture in Nepal. Retrieved from https://ccafs.cgiar.org/publications/climate-smart-agriculture-nepal#.XcKMyjNKiUl.
  • Forest Research and Training Centre. (2019). National Level Forests and Land Cover Analysis of Nepal using Google Earth Images. Retrieved from http://frtc.gov.np/downloadfile/Forest%20and%20Land%20Cover%20Analysis_final_report_1550056440.pdf.
  • Germanwatch. (2019). Global Climate Risk Index 2019 (Germanwatc). Retrieved from https://www.germanwatch.org/en/cri.
  • GGGI. (2018). Accelerating Implementation of Nepal’s Nationally Determined Contribution National Action Plan for Electric Mobility. (April).
  • Government of Nepal. (2014). Nepal Second National Communication to the conference of parties of the United Nations framework convention on climate change. xxii,173.
  • Government of Nepal. (2015). Sustainable Development Goals 2016 - 2030, National (Preliminary) Report.
  • Government of Nepal. (2016a). Forestry Sector Strategy (2016 - 2025).
  • Government of Nepal. (2016b). Nationally Determined Contributions.
  • Government of Nepal. (2018a). Budget Speech of Fiscal Year 2018/19.
  • Government of Nepal. (2018b). Current situation of energy, water resources and irrigation sector and future mapping (white paper).
  • IGES. (2019). 1.5-Degree Lifestyles: Targets and options for reducing lifestyle carbon footprints. Retrieved from https://www.aalto.fi/sites/g/files/flghsv161/files/2019-02/15_degree_lifestyles_mainreport.pdf.
  • International Monetary Fund. (2018). GDP projections for Nepal.
  • Nepali Times. (2019, September 13). Tree-mendous: Community management and outmigration have helped Nepal double its forest area in 25 years. Peter Gill. Retrieved from https://www.nepalitimes.com/banner/tree-mendous/.
  • Onlinekhabar. (2018). Provincial govt announces plans to ban fossil-fueled vehicles in Kathmandu.
  • Sadavarte, P., Rupakheti, M., Bhave, P. V., Shakya, K., & Lawrence, M. G. (2019). Nepal Emission Inventory (NEEMI): a high resolution technology-based bottom-up emissions inventory for Nepal 2001-2016. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, (March), 1–52. https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-113.
  • Shrestha, R. M., & Shakya, S. R. (2012). Benefits of low carbon development in a developing country: Case of Nepal.
  • Tribhuvan University. (2019). Nepal’s GHG Inventory for Third National Communication to the UNFCCC. Retrieved from http://mofe.gov.np/noticefile/Nepal’s%20GHG%20Inventory-Final_version_1562308551.pdf.
  • UNFCCC. (2013). National Adaptation Programmes of Action. (March).
  • UNFCCC. (2014). Statement delivered by Nepal on behalf of The Least Developed Countries (LDC) Group Opening of the High-Level Segment COP-20 / CMP- 10 Lima, Peru, 09/12/14.
  • UNFCCC. (2016). Greenhouse Gas Inventory Data. Retrieved from http://unfccc.int/di/DetailedByParty.do.
  • World Bank Group. (2018). Population, total.

Latest publications

Stay informed

Subscribe to our newsletter